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Friday, January 31, 2014

Stay in "touch"?

Mhhh, how about this. Don't leave me alone!

  http://www.petchatz.com/


But, can we get one? One that gives fresh home made turkey jerky??? Momma??????

 'vie

FDA Proposed Rule on Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food



Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition - Constituent Update
Constituent Updates are also available on the web at
http://www.fda.gov/Food/NewsEvents/ConstituentUpdates/default.htm

Proposed Rule on Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food
January 31, 2014 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today proposed a rule that would require certain shippers, receivers, and carriers who transport food by motor or rail vehicles to take steps to prevent the contamination of human and animal food during transportation. Part of the implementation of the Sanitary Food Transportation Act of 2005, the proposal marks the seventh and final major rule in the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act’s (FSMA) central framework aimed at systematically building preventive measures across the food system. 
The proposed regulation would establish criteria for sanitary transportation practices, such as properly refrigerating food, adequately cleaning vehicles between loads, and properly protecting food during transportation.
The proposed rule would apply to shippers, carriers, and receivers who transport food that will be consumed or distributed in the United States and is intended to ensure that persons engaged in the transportation of food that is at the greatest risk for contamination during transportation follow appropriate sanitary transportation practices. The requirements in the proposed rule would not apply to the transportation of fully packaged shelf-stable foods, live food animals, and raw agricultural commodities when transported by farms.
The FDA intends to hold three public meetings on the proposed rule for the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food. To do so, the agency is first planning on extending the public meetings on the proposed rule for the Intentional Adulteration of Food to include coverage of Sanitary Transportation in two locations. These meetings will be held on February 27, 2014 at the Hilton Chicago in Chicago and on March 13, 2014 at the Sheraton Park Hotel in Anaheim, CA. It is anticipated that the Chicago and Anaheim meetings will remain one day meetings but run until approximately 5:00 p.m. The agency also intends to hold a standalone public meeting on the Sanitary Transportation of Human and Animal Food on March 20, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at the FDA Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition in College Park, MD. The agency will have final Sanitary Transportation meeting details and registration information published shortly.
The proposed rule is available for public comment until May 31, 2014.
For more information:

Worth the READ from Dogs Naturally: A Large Vaccine Problem for Small Dogs

From Dogs Naturally Magazine

A Large Vaccine Problem For Small Dogs

big small dogIf you look at cats, they’re pretty much all the same size. It’s the same with other species like ferrets and horses.
But no other species has such a vast variation in size and weight like the domestic dog does.
This creates a unique vaccination challenge, the consequences of which are starting to surface.

One Size Does Not Fit All

Did you know that a 160 pound Mastiff and a 10 pound Chihuahua both get the same amount of vaccine? Unlike every other veterinary drug, 1 ml of vaccine is given to every dog, regardless of his size.

Why is this a problem?

There seem to be a few problems with this approach. Researchers (Moore, Guptill, Ward et al, “Adverse events diagnosed within three days of vaccine administration in dogs” ) looked at veterinary records  gathered from Banfield veterinary clinics for two years to find any trends in reactions suffered three days after vaccination. What they found was that small breed dogs (especially if they were young or neutered), were at the greatest risk.
In fact, the risk increased as the body weight went down, just like a sliding scale. Overall, dogs weighing 11 pounds or less were four times more likely than dogs over 99 pounds to suffer an adverse event (and medium sized dogs also had an increased risk over larger dogs).

Why Are Small Dogs More At Risk?

The answer to that is simple. Vaccines contain only a small amount of antigen for safety reasons; you wouldn’t want your dog to get rabies from the vaccine! So vaccines contain either small amounts of inactivated antigen or, more recently, subunit antigen particles that look like a virus to the body but can’t really stimulate much of an immune response on their own.
So the vaccine needs to contain some pretty toxic ingredients called adjuvants (stuff like aluminum) that make the body respond to vaccines quicker, longer and more actively. These adjuvants create an inflammatory response that can range from a bump at the injection site to allergic reactions, anaphylaxis and even cardiac arrest. With time, they may even lead to chronic allergies, joint disease and cancer – but we’ll stick to adverse events that occur within 72 hours of vaccination, because most vaccine reactions that occur outside that timeframe (and many do!) aren’t considered vaccine related by most vets and aren’t reported.
So that’s why small dogs are more at risk of vaccine damage…they get the lion’s share of adjuvants (and other things like mercury, formaldehyde and foreign animal protein) in their 1ml of vaccine.

The (Not So) Good News

If you have a small dog, the good news is that antibody titers seem to increase as body weight decreases. That means that the little guys should show protection when you titer test them (and you do titer test instead of vaccinating, right?)
The downside is that while high antibodies mean the body has responded to a vaccine, they also mean that the dog is in a pretty inflamed state and can set the stage for auto-immune disorders like allergies, hypothyroidism, diabetes, joint disease and more.

What About The Large Dogs?

Don’t feel too good about this if you own a large breed dog. Because vaccines are tested on medium sized dogs, the large and giant breeds might not be getting enough! This could be why many large breed dogs are more susceptible to parvovirus, even when vaccinated.

What To Do?

If you choose to vaccinate your pet, it’s a very good idea to run a titer test two to three weeks after the vaccination. This is good for the big guys, because any amount of titer means he will be protected, likely for life, and won’t need another vaccine.
If you have a small guy, ask your vet to give a smaller dose of the vaccine. Again, thanks to titer tests, you can measure whether the dose was large enough to produce immunity in your dog. If it does, he won’t need another vaccine.
There are inexpensive, in-house titer tests available. If your vet doesn’t offer one, encourage him to do so. Alternately, pay to have the titer test sent to a lab. It’s worth the money to do so, if it means protecting your dog from unnecessary vaccination.

What About Rabies?

While vets may be able to give partial doses of the core vaccines, the law requires them to give a full dose of the rabies vaccine. This is bad news indeed for the little guys. If you live in an area where rabies is required, make sure you give the vaccine no more often than necessary. It’s also a good idea to have a homeopathic vet on hand to deal with any possible vaccine reactions or issues. You can find a great homeopathic vet at theavh.org.
Remember that adverse events are vastly under-reported and the incidence of vaccine related disease is much higher than you would think. If you are wondering why you need to vaccinate less, you can view a list of vaccine related health problems and how long vaccines really last here.

Dogs Naturally Magazine

ABBA goes to the dogs!




LIFE SHRINKS OR EXPANDS IN PROPORTION TO ONE'S COURAGE 



 ANAIS NIN


DO YOU HAVE THE COURAGE TO LOVE AND BE LOVED?

'VIE
RESCUE IS A BEAUTIFUL THING
ADOPTION IS A BEAUTIFUL THING

Thursday, January 30, 2014

SUPERBOWL sneak PREVIEW

Now, THAT puppy IS A GREAT actor! Oscar committee are you watching??? 'vie

Thoughtless Thursday Edition... Most popular post....

9765 HITS:




http://www.silvieon4.com/2011/10/thank-you-rachel-zoe-you-are-true.html

ingredients

1 large soft salami (I like to use Hebrew National, but it is hard to find. I have bought it at Costco.)
1 1/2 cups honey mustard
1 1/2 cups apricot or peach jam

preparation

Preheat oven to 375. In a small sauce pan, over medium heat, combine mustard and jam. Stir constantly until mixture is well combines and bubbly. Place salami on wire rack on a cookie sheet. (Hint: Spray the cookie sheet with non-stick baking spray for easier clean-up.) Cut thick slices into the salami leaving the bottom attached. I like the slices pre cut vs making 6-8 diagonal slits in the top of the salami. This will let the fat drip out and marinade drip in during baking. Brush mustard mixture onto salami. Bake for about an hour- to an hour and a half basting every 15 minutes. 
Slice and serve with mustard for dipping and crackers. And for an extra humph... Grate some orange peel over the salami at service.


Our all time most popular post. And momma thinks we are food obsessed????? Ehmmm Hooomans. LOOK INWARD.

The next time that momma tells me that Bichons are food obsessed, I am going to rub her face in this bit of reality. Oh am I evah going to rub her nose in this. And auntie Robin. Do I need to say something to you as well???

And... this is not unusual. Look at
http://bermudabluez.blogspot.com/2014/01/thoughtless-thursday-cherry-vodka.html

What is it with you hoooomans, are all two leggeds obsessed with food and drink?

Have any of you ever tried a good belly rub?

You should.

'vie


SUNSET. Stepmother Nature painted the sky pink









She knows that pink is my favorite color. But until she makes that snow go away, I am still mad at her.
But it was pretty while it lasted. And.. it did not last very long.  She seems to be impatient.

 So, enjoy it.  I am sharing it with you.

'vie

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

PMI Nutrition, LLC Recalls Red Flannel® Cat Food Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination

Recall -- Firm Press Release



PMI Nutrition, LLC Recalls Red Flannel® Cat Food Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination


Contact:
Consumer:
(800) 332-4738

Media:
Rebecca Lentz(651) 375-5949

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - January 25, 2014 - PMI Nutrition, LLC (PMI), Arden Hills, Minn., has initiated a voluntary recall of its 20 lb. bags of Red Flannel® Cat Formula cat food for possible Salmonella contamination. There have been no reports of illness related to this product to date. This recall is being issued out of an abundance of caution after routine testing by the FDA Detroit District Office identified possible Salmonella contamination.
Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.
Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.
Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.
Red Flannel® Cat Food was manufactured by a third-party manufacturer for PMI. The product was sold through dealers to customers distributed in the following states: Alabama, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, North Carolina, North Dakota, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Vermont, Wisconsin and West Virginia.
The lot number is printed on the lower back side of the bag in a white box on the right-hand side. The lot number will be preceded by a time stamp that will be unique to each bag. (Example 14:32) The lot number and best-by date impacted by this recall are as follows:
Best by 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A (lot number)
The UPC code for the recalled product is: 7 42869 00058 5.
No other products/lot numbers are affected by this recall.
Customers should immediately discontinue use of and return impacted product to their dealer for a full refund or replacement. We continue to work with impacted dealers and distributors to trace the bags.
For more information on the recall, customers can contact the customer service line for PMI products at 1-800-332-4738. Customer service representatives will be available Sunday, Jan. 26 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. CST and Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. CST.
###
Recalled Product Photos Are Also Available on FDA's Flickr Photostream.
    
Page Last Updated: 01/26/2014 
Note: If you need help accessing information in different file formats, see Instructions for Downloading Viewers and Players.

Hey, what the hey is all this stuff???????????

This is my street, supposedly. No yellow cat, no walkers, joggers, dogs, squirrels or birds. It is all covered in the wet and cold. Yea that it my name for that four letter word I refuse to say out loud!

Somebody please tell Step Mother Nature... [she is behaving like a Step Mother not a Mother!] that I live in the SOUTH.  I need sunshine and warmth and grass, not this white mess.






Look... faced with the white, cold wet caca... I decided that...




This is as far as I was willing to "walk" to tinkle. Yuh. that is the threshold. Yuh I made yellow snow. No, they are not happy about it. Well, pick up the clue phone, I AM NOT HAPPY EITHER.

'vie

Tuesday, January 28, 2014

What do you fall asleep to?

Nora miscora miscora miscorgundo gundo senaido senai senailema lema cuflema cuflai cuflailikki likki ciflikki. Sebhai neberki woza wodahaki. For my hooman siblings. I miss you too. I know you have been asking momma. SHE LIES. SHE IS JEALOUS that I miss you. 'vie

Tasty Tuesday ...Please bring back the turkey jerky!


It is , it is !!!!!! TASTY TUESDAY!!!!
Mhh I was just thinking momma....
How about  you making the big tray of turkey jerky "appear again out of that magic box?



Remember???
You did it before.




We were good.  We kept a vigil.
We did not attack it.
We were POLITE





Please?! 


Mommaaaaaa, where are going?  You need to cook or something, it is Tasty TUESDAY!!!!!


'vie

Monday, January 27, 2014

In my momma's arms ....

 Magic happens

 The world goes away. You get filled with the feeling of love, safety, warmth, joy.
 No words, no barks, our eyes meet and nothing needs to be said.
I love her, she loves me and  don't you see? It is the magic of momma's arms.
'vie

Saturday, January 25, 2014

WORTH THE READ





http://www.nbcnews.com/health/pet-jerky-veterinarians-group-wont-discourage-use-2D11988775


" “Do I think animals are getting sick because they’re eating jerky treats? Yes,” said Kendal Harr, a Seattle vet and a clinical pathologist who helped push a petition for the resolution at the AVMA’s house of delegates meeting Jan. 10-11."

yet....


"The AVMA, like the FDA, says that while it’s clear animals who’ve eaten treats have become ill or died, there’s no conclusive proof of the cause. The FDA has been testing jerky products for more than five years, to no avail."


DUHHHHHH FOLLOW THE $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$


The treats are part of the $21 billion U.S. pet food industry, including $54 million in sales last year for Waggin’ Train and nearly $60 million for Milo’s Kitchen treats, according to data compiled by Packaged Facts, a market research group."
"In the meantime, the AVMA and the FDA both remind owners that jerky treats are not a necessary part of a pet’s diet and to seek medical care at the first sign of gastric distress or kidney trouble. "

color me DISGUSTED 


'vie

SNOW crazy momma

Dear Saint Bichon De Frise{yes click on this]


You need to melt all the snow and give us back our grass. 
Have you looked out there? It's a mess!
And...
let's get real...
Momma is playing coat dress up with us
And that's NOT a good deal.
[prayers have to rhyme... I think]

She does not need any more justification to play dress up with us.
Do we look happy?
No.
Nuff said.

And... she has booties ready to try on us. Seriously?


Bewildered... JD trying to make sense of nonsense...

My confrontational look... which momma ignored...


I TRIED very hard with this "ARE YOU KIDDING"? Look... but momma is dense.


By now I was grumbling and calling daddy for help.

Turning my back DID NOT WORK and neither did Talk to the PAW....


Yes, Wendy and I just hunkered down and SUFFERED together. I hope Auntie Robin sees this.

Yes, our expressions say it all..."HELP- Momma is nuts"

Momma was driven nuts by SNOW!

Sant Bichon de Frise, please, make the sun shine!
'vie

Badges!? Oh, good! We need stinkin' badges.


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